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Post Achilles Tendon Rupture Exercises

Achilles Tendinitis Rupture of Achilles tendon is the most common among those taking place in the lower extremities, being twice as common in men than in women between 30-50 years old and usually caused while doing sport. There are some risk factors such as age or chronic treatments based on corticosteroids or antibiotics when belonging to Quinolones group. Spontaneous bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon is much more infrequent, being almost exceptional in young and healthy patients without known pathological conditions.

Repeated stress from a variety of causes is often the cause of Achilles tendon injury. The stress may occur from any of the following. Excessive activity or overuse. Flat feet. Poorly fitting or inadequate shoes. Inadequate warm-up or proper conditioning. Jogging or running on hard surfaces. Older recreational athlete. Previous Achilles tendon injury (tendonitis/rupture). Repeated steroid injections. Sudden changes in intensity of exercise. Use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (especially in children). Trauma to the ankle. Tense calf muscles prior to exercise. Weak calf muscles.

Symptoms usually come on gradually. Depending on the severity of the injury, they can include Achilles pain, which increases with specific activity, with local tenderness to touch. A sensation that the tendon is grating or cracking when moved. Swelling, heat or redness around the area. The affected tendon area may appear thicker in comparison to the unaffected side. There may be weakness when trying to push up on to the toes. The tendon can feel very stiff first thing in the morning (care should be taken when getting out of bed and when making the first few steps around the house). A distinct gap in the line of the tendon (partial tear).

An Achilles' tendon injury can be diagnosed by applying the Thompson Test (or Calf Squeeze Test) this is where the person who has suffered the injury lies on their front with their legs bent. Whoever is performing the test, usually a doctor, will then squeeze the calf muscle. If the tendon has not ruptured then the foot should point briefly away from the leg.

Non Surgical Treatment
Non-surgical treatment of Achilles tendon rupture is usually reserved for patients who are relatively sedentary or may be at higher risk for complications with surgical intervention (due to other associated medical problems). This involves a period of immobilization, followed by range of motion and strengthening exercises; unfortunately, it is associated with a higher risk of re-rupture of the tendon, and possibly a less optimal functional outcome. Achilles Tendinitis

Surgical Treatment
Surgery is recommended to those who are young to middle-aged and active. The ruptured tendon is sewn together during surgery. This is an outpatient procedure. Afterward the leg is put into a splint cast or walking boot. Physical therapy will be recommended. In about 4 to 6 months, healing is nearly complete. However, it can take up to a year to return to sports fully.